New England IP Blog

Covering intellectual property developments in New England, and other developments that impact New England companies.

Category Archives: Ethics

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Court Disqualifies Law Firm in Patent Suit, Finding No Quick Fix for Rule 1.7 Violation

Chief Judge Saris in the District of Massachusetts recently granted a motion to disqualify the Sunstein law firm from representing Altova in a patent suit against Syncro Soft, upon finding that the conflict was foreseeable based on the history of the parties’ interactions and their status as direct competitors.  Both companies operate in the market … Continue Reading

Massachusetts Court Clears Patent Prosecutors of Malpractice Claims Arising From Representation of Clients in Same Technology Area

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court yesterday affirmed a lower court’s dismissal of a legal malpractice suit finding that, “simultaneous representation by a law firm in the prosecution of patents for two clients competing in the same technology area for similar inventions is not a per se violation,” of certain Massachusetts attorney professional conduct rules. The … Continue Reading

Serial Adversaries Are Still No Big Deal

Judge Indira Talwani issued an order on plaintiff Erik Cherdak’s renewal of his motion to disqualify, which we talked about last year in Serial Adversaries Are No Big Deal. And once again, she found that for Cooley, serial adversaries are still no issue. Judge Talwani again found no evidence that Cooley’s representation of two separate … Continue Reading

Don’t Sleep on Rule 37 Motions

What do you get when opposing counsel repeatedly cancels depositions only days before they are scheduled, allegedly fails to abide by confidentiality agreements and court orders, and repeatedly files supposedly baseless motions requiring substantive responses? Perhaps nothing. At least that appears to be the case from a recent order issued in Massachusetts federal court.… Continue Reading

Serial Adversaries Are No Big Deal

Massachusetts District Court Judge Indira Talwani reminded litigants that for lawyers to be conflicted out of a case, they must be on the other side of the “v” from a former client, not a former adversary, since the issue is ultimately whether counsel will be constrained from vigorous representation of their new client.  The order concerned a case … Continue Reading
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